Two Hour Bread/Buns

Two Hour Bread

Two Hour Bread

Yesterday I spent the afternoon baking some bread and buns.  This is a very easy recipe and only takes a little over 2 hours from start to finish.  I would credit whoever I got the recipe from, but it’s simply a recipe I have in my recipe box written on an index card from years ago.  It is a great all purpose bread.  I’ve used it for grilled cheese sandwiches, toast, sandwiches, etc.  I used to work in the quality assurance department at a flour mill and so part of my job was to bake bread to test flour/mixes, so I am going to apply some of the methods learned there to this recipe.  Now if only I had a proofer…

Two Hour Bread/Buns

Printable recipe here.

*If you want to be able to make this recipe in a Kitchen Aid mixer, I would half the recipe (half recipe in parenthesis) as the full recipe is too big to be made in a mixer.  I learned the hard way and had to separate the dough into two roughly equal pieces that could fit into the mixer and add additional flour until I reached the right consistency.  Then I repeated this for the other half and then put them together in a big bowl to rise.

Ingredients

  • 8 cups warm water (~110 degrees F) (4 cups warm water)
  • 1 Tbsp sugar (1/2 Tbsp sugar)
  • 2 Tbsp yeast (1 Tbsp yeast)
  • 1 1/2 cup oil (3/4 cup oil)
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt (1/4 Tbsp salt = 3/4 tsp salt)
  • 7 cups whole wheat flour (3.5 cups whole wheat flour)
  • 10 cups white flour (5 cups white flour)

Directions:

1. In a large measuring cup combine ~110 degree F water, sugar, and yeast.  Stir well, then let sit for 5 – 10 minutes, or until yeast has doubled.

What yeast mixture should look like

What yeast mixture should look like

2. Pour yeast mixture into mixer bowl.  Add oil, salt, whole wheat flour and white flour.  Mix together using a dough hook, until dough is soft and not sticky (dough should make a slapping sound as it hits the sides of the bowl).  If too sticky, add more flour.

3. Put in a well greased bowl.  Cover loosely with plastic wrap and a tea towel and let rise for 1 hour in a warm place.

4. If making a full recipe, you should get 6 loaves and two dozen buns.  If making a half recipe you should get 3 loaves and a dozen buns.  To make my loaves an equal size (and not too big for the pans) I scaled each piece of dough to be roughly 640 grams.

Scaling bread for equal sized loaves

Scaling bread for equal sized loaves

5. Spray bread pans with non-stick spray.  Shape dough into loaves, place in pans, cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rise for 30 minutes (or until doubled).  Roll buns on lightly floured surface and let rise for 30 minutes as well.  I learned a very useful technique for rolling buns when working at the flour mill that I will try to get a video of one day to put up here as describing it just won’t do it justice.

Here are a couple of videos that I hope will help with the bun rolling:  These are the first videos I’ve even made trying to show technique so I apologize if the’re not that great:

This video demonstrates rolling one bun at a time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TmwNClcm7c

This video demonstrates rolling two buns at a time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFVNqQqcM14

Loaves shaped, ready to be covered and left to rise

Loaves shaped, ready to be covered and left to rise

6. While bread and buns are rising, preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  Bake buns for 20 – 25 minutes.  Bake bread for 35 – 40 minutes, until golden brown (about 30 minutes for me, when using convection).

Two hour bread/buns

Two hour bread/buns

That’s it, that’s all.  Simple, delicious, and nothing matches the smell of bread baking in the oven or the taste of a slice of warm bread fresh out of the oven.

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